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The two fall in love, and the hero thereby commences an ascent to levels of life miles removed from those he's hitherto known. WE'RE now scarcely more than a tenth of our way through ''Winter's Tale,'' and my plot summary is a tissue of to me painful omissions.

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No mention of Peter Lake's sexual initiation and education in the Bayonne Marsh through the kindness of young women known to the Marshmen as ''anarindas. In ''Winter's Tale'' hope is the thing with fetlocks. No hint of the magnificently imagined first encounter between Peter Lake and the clamorous and varied streets of Lower Manhattan. No report, either, concerning Peter Lake's wonder at - or attempts to seduce - the lovely flock of anarindas who parade those streets. I can report that, through his connection with Beverly Penn, Peter Lake comes to know the mysterious Lake of the Coheeries, ''which was so far upstate that no one could find it,'' an idyllic snowbound world wherein the Penn family had a country house and numerous far-out acquaintances.

I can report, further, that, between the tragic death of Peter Lake and his reappearance ''against all odds'' at the close of the century, for the purpose of performing a few selected miracles for friends imperiled by cataclysm the burning of Manhattan , several other heroes and heroines take center stage.

There's Hardesty Marratta, for instance, a Californian whose father obliges him to choose between an inheritance of millions and a family heirloom - an inscribed gold salver worth a paltry thousand or two. The inscription on the salver reads: ''For what can be imagined more beautiful than the sight of a perfectly just city rejoicing in justice alone. Besides Hardesty Marratta, there's the liberated Virginia Gamely, famous newspaper critic of the moral performance of the city of New York. There's a Danish woman whose search for a perfect animal she once rescued from the sea leads her deep into New York's ''city of the poor'' where, in a savagely Blakeian arena, human ''animal fighters'' battle horses with swords and pikes before mobs of brutalized fans.

And the balance of the huge cast includes a billionaire Malapropian newspaper-chain owner whose nitwit papers run almost nothing on the front and inner pages but restaurant reviews, accommodating every breaking story on the wire to the lingo of gourmandise. And there's an inscrutable world-class engineer at work on the construction of a span of golden light aimed at infinity. It's not through any of these unique natures, though, or through an account of the touching, hilarious, strikingly variegated personages of the book that one best approaches the golden core of ''Winter's Tale.

Helprin's transformation of the statue scene in Shakespeare's ''The Winter's Tale'' is wonderfully moving. No, the heart of this book resides unquestionably in its moral energy, in the thousand original gestures, ruminations, Woola Woola writing feats that summon its audience beyond the narrow limits of conventional vision, commanding us to see our time and place afresh.

Is it not astonishing that a work so rooted in fantasy, filled with narrative high jinks and comic flights, stands forth centrally as a moral discourse?

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It is indeed. And although I would insist that it's the vividness of the ideal in this book that's the source of its moral weight, and although it's clearly the fantasies that carry the ideal, I do not pretend to know why or how the marvelous concord of discords in Mr.

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Helprin's ''Winter's Tale'' is achieved. I can testify only to the force of the book's summons to wider vision, to the strength of its command to see anew and to the pivotal significance of the author's reflections on the city itself in driving us toward awareness of his fundamental seriousness. Heeding his summons, obeying his command, means sustaining steady alertness to the ranges of contradiction that must be embodied in any human being laying claim to a vital life in a metropolis.

The obligation, as spelled out in ''Winter's Tale,'' is to shed indifference and apathy, to realize the suffering through which one walks - the suffering of small children living and dying like beasts, against which Peter Lake cries out to a self-made publisher, Isaac Penn. Good News Translation Make sure that your endurance carries you all the way without failing, so that you may be perfect and complete, lacking nothing. Holman Christian Standard Bible But endurance must do its complete work, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking nothing.

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International Standard Version But you must let endurance have its full effect, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking nothing. NET Bible And let endurance have its perfect effect, so that you will be perfect and complete, not deficient in anything. New Heart English Bible Let endurance have its perfect work, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing. Aramaic Bible in Plain English But patience will have a complete work for itself that you would be perfected and complete, and that you would be lacking nothing. Then you will be mature and complete, and you won't need anything.

New American Standard And let endurance have its perfect result, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing. Jubilee Bible and the patience finishes the work, that ye may be perfect and entire, not lacking in anything. King James Bible But let patience have her perfect work, that you may be perfect and entire, lacking in nothing.

American King James Version But let patience have her perfect work, that you may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing.


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American Standard Version And let patience have its perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, lacking in nothing. Douay-Rheims Bible And patience hath a perfect work; that you may be perfect and entire, failing in nothing. Darby Bible Translation But let endurance have [its] perfect work, that ye may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing. English Revised Version And let patience have its perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, lacking in nothing.

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Webster's Bible Translation But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing. Weymouth New Testament Only let endurance have perfect results so that you may become perfect and complete, deficient in nothing. But in the end, the wisdom in these pages is in no respect whatever parochial. The affirming voices that one is reminded of are those of Blake and Whitman. THE story told in ''Winter's Tale'' begins in the late 19th century, jumping abruptly, in mid-course, to the year Its focus is a series of interconnected heroic lives, chief of which is that of Peter Lake, orphan, burglar, lover, idealist, mechanic first- class.

Son of would-be immigrants who are rejected because the mother is consumptive, Peter Lake is reared by clamdiggers on the Bayonne Marsh and sent as a boy to make his way in Manhattan, where, in those days, ''more than half a million. Mootfowl and his pupils are, of course, exactly what the climax of the 19th century demanded: The machine was touching the summit of its ascendancy.

After learning the ''vast traditional physics of those who called themselves mechanics,'' he joins the Short Tails, a remarkable band of thieves led by another Dickensian figure named Pearly Soames. For 10 years Peter Lake practices the arts of burglar, bagman and ''Woola Woola boy. The jumper, aided by ''alloy spring boots'' - a Peter Lake invention - jumps ''15 feet in the air while excitedly screaming, 'Woola woola woola!

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At length Peter Lake breaks with Pearly Soames and the Short Tails, locates solitary digs in the vaulted roof of Grand Central Station and launches himself as an independent second-story man working the great houses uptown. On one outing, while knocking over the mansion of a powerful newspaper publisher, he happens upon Beverly Penn, beautiful, consumptive concert pianist. The two fall in love, and the hero thereby commences an ascent to levels of life miles removed from those he's hitherto known. WE'RE now scarcely more than a tenth of our way through ''Winter's Tale,'' and my plot summary is a tissue of to me painful omissions.

No mention of Peter Lake's sexual initiation and education in the Bayonne Marsh through the kindness of young women known to the Marshmen as ''anarindas. In ''Winter's Tale'' hope is the thing with fetlocks. No hint of the magnificently imagined first encounter between Peter Lake and the clamorous and varied streets of Lower Manhattan. No report, either, concerning Peter Lake's wonder at - or attempts to seduce - the lovely flock of anarindas who parade those streets. I can report that, through his connection with Beverly Penn, Peter Lake comes to know the mysterious Lake of the Coheeries, ''which was so far upstate that no one could find it,'' an idyllic snowbound world wherein the Penn family had a country house and numerous far-out acquaintances.

I can report, further, that, between the tragic death of Peter Lake and his reappearance ''against all odds'' at the close of the century, for the purpose of performing a few selected miracles for friends imperiled by cataclysm the burning of Manhattan , several other heroes and heroines take center stage.

There's Hardesty Marratta, for instance, a Californian whose father obliges him to choose between an inheritance of millions and a family heirloom - an inscribed gold salver worth a paltry thousand or two. The inscription on the salver reads: ''For what can be imagined more beautiful than the sight of a perfectly just city rejoicing in justice alone. Besides Hardesty Marratta, there's the liberated Virginia Gamely, famous newspaper critic of the moral performance of the city of New York.

There's a Danish woman whose search for a perfect animal she once rescued from the sea leads her deep into New York's ''city of the poor'' where, in a savagely Blakeian arena, human ''animal fighters'' battle horses with swords and pikes before mobs of brutalized fans. And the balance of the huge cast includes a billionaire Malapropian newspaper-chain owner whose nitwit papers run almost nothing on the front and inner pages but restaurant reviews, accommodating every breaking story on the wire to the lingo of gourmandise.